Stromboli with goats cheese, semi-dried tomatoes and roasted garlic

I’ve been making Stromboli for nearly 10 years and this recipe is absolutely yummy!

An authentic Stromboli is a light dough, it’s kind of a cross between a pizza base and a focaccia style bread. Stromboli is usually stuffed with tomatoes herbs and cheese and rolled up like a Swiss roll before it’s baked.

This version is a little different in that, rather than using ordinary water for the liquid content, I used goats milk.  Now don’t laugh, there is a reason which you can carry on reading and find out why that is. But, if you are impatient then you can just skip to the printable recipe for my Stromboli.

But I’d love for you to read on……

Why use goats milk? Well it’s because I’d originally made cheese!

Last year for Christmas my parents bought my husband a cheese making kit. It’s a big kit to make several different cheeses. Every weekend since last Christmas we’ve intended to give it a go, and each time we’d get the kit out and then chicken out thinking that the making of cheese would be complicated.  Eventually, after procrastinating for nearly 8 months we though – no more – lets do it!

Goats cheeseWe decided to start with something we both love – goats cheese. The actual making of the cheese was actually very easy and I don’t know what the heck we were worrying about. Below is a picture of our finished cheese – and let me tell you it was blooming lovely!

Anyway, I digress. Making the cheese making required 4 pints of goats milk (I know it’s quite a bit just to end up with 500g of cheese!) We could only buy it in litre cartons so had just over a pint left when we finished making the cheese. Despite the fact that there is loads of milk for not much cheese it was worth doing and the finished cheese rivalled some we’ve eaten in France (honest).

As you know, I hate waste so decided to try and incorporate the left over goats milk into a bread.

I knew it would need to be a special bread because goats milk is quite rich and, although it might suit an ordinary bread, I wanted to make something different that could show off the ingredients to their best.

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I also know that goats cheese and sun-dried tomatoes go really well together and I’ve recently been experimenting with my new food dehydrator.  I’d made some semi-dried tomatoes from our own crop (well the ones that were red that is) in order to preserve their shelf-life. The finished semi-dried tomatoes are wonderfully strong and rich in flavour and when I tasted them I also knew that I wanted to incorporate them into a bread somehow.

So the final decision to make the goats cheese and semi-dried tomato Stromboli was settled as I was able to incorporate the left over goats milk, some of our homemade goats cheese, our garlic crop AND my semi-dried tomatoes.

This is actually quite an easy recipe and you could use ordinary shop bought sun-dried tomatoes if you prefer. You can also stuff with mozzarella, ordinary cheddar, just parmesan or any combination of herbs you like. The trick is not to use anything that is too wet, otherwise your finished loaf will be soggy. Also, don’t be tempted to ‘over stuff’. I’ve done this in the past, again, the finished bread will be soggy and you may get leakage!

Whatever you decide to stuff it with, once cooked the finished bread is best served warm and goes well with any pasta dish. If you have any left over you can rewarm it in the oven the next day.

I hope you have a go at this recipe. I’ve popped some step by step images below, but if you don’t want to see the pictures you can just  Skip to the printable recipe.

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Step 1 – Make the dough

  • Time = 5 – 10 minutes kneading, 1 hour resting
  • Ingredients = 350g of strong white bread flour, 1tsp of dried yeast or 15g of fresh, 1/2 tsp granulated sugar, 1tsp salt (the fine stuff) and 220ml of slightly warmed goats milk (i.e. not straight from the fridge).
  1. Warm your goats milk until it’s just warm to the touch.
  2. If not using instant yeast, place 50ml of the milk, your yeast and sugar into a little bowl and stir to dissolve. Leave for 5 minutes until it’s nice and frothy. If using instant yeast that does not need to be activated you can skip this step.
  3. Place the flour and salt a mixing bowl and stir.
  4. When your yeast mixture is nice and frothy, make a well in the centre of the flour mixture and tip in the yeast mixture. Give it a stir.
  5. Gradually add your milk mixture (you may not need all of it) until your dough comes together and leaves no crumbs of flour in the bowl. Note this is not a wet dough, it’s actually on the drier side so don’t be tempted to add too much liquid at once. You are aiming for a soft pliable dough but not sticky wet.
  6. As soon as the dough comes together as in step 5, knead on a work surface for about 10 minutes until you have a smooth dough. (If using a stand mixer, mix on speed 4 for 5 minutes).
  7. Pop the kneaded dough back in the bowl, cover and leave to prove for an hour (it may take longer depending on how warm your kitchen is – basically you want it to be doubled in bulk).

Image 1 = The frothy yeast mixture Image 2 = The dough once kneaded (notice it’s drier than some I’ve made). Image 3 = In the bowl ready for the first rise. Image 4 = The dough after it’s first rise – see it’s doubled in bulk).

Step 2 – Knock the dough back, roll, stuff and rise again.

  • Time = 5 minutes to roll, a couple of minutes to stuff, 30 minutes to 1 hour to rise again.
  • Ingredients for the filling = 1 whole bulb of garlic which has been roasted. See this post here for instructions on how to roast the garlic. A couple of dollops of sun-dried tomato paste or Passata. 100 – 150g of soft goats cheese, a handful of semi-dried (or sun-dried) tomatoes, 75g of coarsely grated parmesan cheese, a liberal sprinkling of herbs – I used dried oregano and basil but you could easily use fresh and some semolina or fine flour for rolling/dusting.
  1. Lightly dust your work surface with semolina flour (or fine flour).
  2. Punch down your risen dough in the bowl and pop onto a work surface. The dough should feel quite soft and lovely and pillowy.
  3. Roll out your dough into a rough longish shape just longer and wider than your rolling pin (see image below). If it resists just leave it for a minute to relax and try again.
  4. Spread a little bit of the Passata or sun-dried tomato paste on the bottom of the rolled out dough – but not right to the edges. Squidge your roasted garlic out onto the dough – distributing evenly, pop your sun dried tomatoes on next (no need to rehydrate any of these, the steam in the oven will do that for you). Now dollop on your goats cheese, sprinkle on your parmesan and finally your herbs.
  5. Starting at one short end, gently roll your bread (Swiss roll style) into a long sausage shape. Pinch the seam well to make sure it’s sealed.
  6. Flip the bread over and place on a lined baking sheet. Take a long skewer and make some air holes – you need to go almost all the way, but not right through the dough.  This step is vital to ensure the filling inside cooks evenly and your bread does not burst.  Now cover and rest for half an hour (or until it’s virtually doubled and when you press on the dough it almost springs back).

Image = 1 Roll out the dough to just bigger than your rolling pin. Image 2 = Spread your toppings on – make sure to leave a gap. Image 3 = Roll it up (short edge to short edge) and seal. Image 4 = Placed on a lined baking sheet, use a skewer to poke some air holes.

Step 3 – Oil, sprinkle with herbs, bake, Enjoy!

  • Time = A couple of minutes to prepare,  30 – 40 minutes to bake, 5 mins to rest and no time at all to eat!
  • Oven temp = 200 (fan) 220 (non fan).
  • Ingredients = A small amount of oil and a sprinkling of whatever herbs you’ve used inside.
  1. About 10 minutes before your dough is ready, pre-heat the oven to 200 fan or 220 non fan.
  2. When ready, use a pastry brush to gently brush the top of your risen loaf with oil (I used olive) and then sprinkle with herbs.
  3. Pop into your pre-heated oven and bake for 10 minutes without opening the door. After 10 minutes, check the colour and if it’s browning too quickly. If it is, turn the temperature down by 5-10 degrees and continue to bake for a further 20 – 30 minutes. If after 10 minutes the colour is OK then leave at the higher temperature for as long as you can.  Once the bread has had it’s time, you’ll know it’s cooked as it will sound hollow when tapped.
  4. Remove from the oven, cool for 5 minutes on a wire rack, cut and Enjoy!

Image 1 = The rolled bread with the oil and herby topping. Image 2 = The bread straight from the oven 3 = The bread once baked and cut.

I hope you enjoy making and eating this bread, I certainly did.

Below is the printable recipe for my goats cheese and semi-dried tomato stromboli.

For other recipes on my site please follow this link.

Sign off image

Stromboli with goats cheese, semi-dried tomatoes and roasted garlic

  • Servings: 1 loaf
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

Wonderfully light and tasty garlic baguettes.

As I’ve said above in the main post, even though I’ve used goats cheese, semi-dried toms and roasted garlic for this recipe you can stuff this bread with pretty much anything you like as long as the fillings are not too wet.

Ingredients

    For the Bread
  • 350g of strong white bread flour
  • 1tsp of instant dried yeast (15g if using fresh)
  • 1tsp of fine sea salt
  • For the filling
  • 1 whole bulb of garlic which has been roasted. See this post here for instructions on how to roast the garlic.
  • A couple of dollops of sun-dried tomato paste or Passata.
  • 100 – 150g of soft goats cheese.
  • A handful of semi-dried (or sun-dried) tomatoes.
  • 75g of coarsely grated parmesan cheese
  • A liberal sprinkling of herbs – I used dried oregano and basil but you could easily use fresh
  • Fine semolina or fine flour for rolling/dusting.
  • For the glaze topping
  • A small amount of oil for brushing
  • A sprinkling of whatever herbs you’ve used inside.

Directions

  1. Gently warm your goats milk until it’s just warm to the touch.
  2. If you are not using instant yeast, place 50ml of the milk, your yeast and sugar into a little bowl and stir to dissolve. Leave for 5 minutes until it’s nice and frothy. If using instant yeast that does not need to be activated you can skip this step.
  3. Place the flour and salt a mixing bowl and stir and when your yeast mixture is nice and frothy, make a well in the centre of the flour mixture and tip in the yeast mixture. Give it a stir. Gradually add your milk mixture (you may not need all of it) until your dough comes together and leaves no crumbs of flour in the bowl. Note this is not a wet dough, it’s actually on the drier side so don’t be tempted to add too much liquid at once. You are aiming for a soft pliable dough but not sticky wet. As soon as the dough comes together, knead on a work surface for about 10 minutes until you have a smooth dough. (If using a stand mixer, mix on speed 4 for 5 minutes). Pop the kneaded dough back in the bowl, cover and leave to prove for an hour (it may take longer depending on how warm your kitchen is – basically you want it to be doubled in bulk).
  4. Once your dough has doubled, lightly dust your work surface with semolina flour (or fine flour). Punch down your risen dough in the bowl and pop onto a work surface. The dough should feel quite soft and lovely and pillowy. Roll out your dough into a rough longish shape just longer and wider than your rolling pin (see image in the step by step above). If it resists just leave it for a minute to relax and try again.
  5. Spread a little bit of the Passata or sun-dried tomato paste on the bottom of the rolled out dough – but not right to the edges. Squidge your roasted garlic out onto the dough – distributing evenly, pop your sun dried tomatoes on next (no need to rehydrate any of these, the steam in the oven will do that for you). Now dollop on your goats cheese, sprinkle on your parmesan and finally your herbs.
  6. Starting at one short end, gently roll your bread (Swiss roll style) into a long sausage shape. Pinch the seam well to make sure it’s sealed. Flip the bread over and place on a lined baking sheet. Take a long skewer and make some air holes – you need to go almost all the way, but not right through the dough. This step is vital to ensure the filling inside cooks evenly and your bread does not burst. Now cover and rest for half an hour (or until it’s virtually doubled and when you press on the dough it almost springs back).
  7. About 10 minutes before your dough is ready, pre-heat the oven to 200 fan or 220 non fan. When ready, use a pastry brush to gently brush the top of your risen loaf with oil (I used olive) and then sprinkle with herbs. Pop into your pre-heated oven and bake for 10 minutes without opening the door. After 10 minutes, check the colour to see whether it’s browning too quickly. If it is, turn the temperature down by 5-10 degrees and continue to bake for a further 20 – 30 minutes. If it isn’t then leave at the higher temperature for as long as you can. Once the bread has had it’s time, you’ll know it’s cooked as it will sound hollow when tapped. Remove from the oven, cool for 5 minutes on a wire rack, cut and Enjoy!

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Bread, Baking and More

Lover of bread, baking and growing my own veg.

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